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Articles

Building university capabilities to respond to climate change through participatory action research: towards a comparative analytical framework

 

By Nussey, C., Frediani, A.A., Lagi, R., Mazutti, J. and Nyerere, J.

Overview

This paper aims to explore how the principles of participatory action research (PAR) articulate with questions of climate justice.  Drawing on three qualitative case studies in Brazil, Fiji and Kenya, the paper explores university institutional capabilities, asking how the principles of mobilising PAR to support transformative outcomes can further climate justice.  The paper argues that for participatory action research to become a pathway to build universities’ capabilities, key considerations are needed. PAR needs to: a) move beyond change in individual behaviour to respond to climate change and affect institutional norms, procedures and practices; b) recognise and partner with marginalised groups whose voice and experiences are at the periphery of climate debate, enabling reciprocal flows of impact and knowledge between universities and wider societies; and c) foster ‘relationships of equivalence’ with actors within as well as outside university to influence university governance and wider climate related policy-making processes. 

Suggested citation 

Nussey, C., Frediani, A.A., Lagi, R., Mazutti, J. and Nyerere, J. (2022) Building university capabilities to respond to climate change through participatory action research: towards a comparative analytical framework, Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Volume 23, Issue 1, pp. 95-115

Rethinking the unthinkable: what can educational engagements with culture offer the climate crisis?

 

By Charlotte Nussey

Overview

This essay considers the ways in which education and cultural relations offers lessons, new ideas and ways of talking and listening about the climate emergency. Nussey argues that the climate emergency cannot be addressed by technical responses and innovations alone, but requires a socio-cultural response, inclusive of culture and education. The essay spotlights theClimate-U project and askshow higher education institutions in the Global South can contribute to tackling climate change. This essay is part of the British Council’s Climate Connection

Suggested citation 

Nussey, Charlotte (2021) Rethinking the unthinkable: what can educational engagements with culture offer the climate crisis?, British Council Cultural Relations Collection (online).